Permanent Resident Status (Green Cards)

Information and Forms

Need this information in another language? Visit Google Translate. Be aware that legal terms may not translate accurately. Do not rely on the translation for legal information or advice. Always seek the advice of an attorney before taking legal action. You can call MLSA at 1-800-666-6899 and ask for help from an interpreter to get more information on your legal issue.

¿Necesita esta información en otro idioma? Visite Google Translate. Tenga en cuenta que las traducciones de términos legales pueden no ser correctos. No confíe solo en estas traducciones para información o asesoría legal. Siempre busque el consejo de un abogado antes de tomar acción legal. Usted puede llamar a Servicios Legales de Montana (MLSA) al 1-800-666-6899 y pedir la ayuda de un intérprete para obtener más información sobre su problema legal.

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Battered Spouse, Children, and Parents

As a battered spouse, child or parent, you may file an immigrant visa petition under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), as amended by the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).

Consular Processing

The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) offers an individual two primary paths to permanent resident status (a green card). An individual who is the beneficiary of an approved immigrant petition and has an immigrant visa number immediately available may apply at a U.S. Department of State consulate abroad for an immigrant visa in order to come to the United States and be admitted as a permanent resident. This pathway is referred to as “consular processing.”

Family Immigration

A lawful permanent resident is a foreign national who has been granted the privilege of permanently living and working in the United States. If you want to become a lawful permanent resident based on the fact that you have a relative who is a citizen of the United States or is a lawful permanent resident, your relative in the United States will need to sponsor you and prove he/she has enough income or assets to support you, the intending immigrant(s) when in the United States.

Green Card for a Family Member of a Permanent Resident

To promote family unity, immigration law allows permanent residents of the United States (green card holders) to petition for certain eligible relatives to come and live permanently in the United States. A permanent resident may petition for his/her spouse and unmarried child(ren) of any age to immigrate to the United States.

Green Card for an Immediate Relative of a U.S. Citizen

To promote family unity, immigration law allows U.S. citizens to petition for certain qualified relatives to come and live permanently in the United States. Eligible immediate relatives include the U.S. citizen’s spouse, unmarried child under the age of 21, or parent (if the U.S. citizen is over the age of 21).

Green Cards

The steps to becoming a Green Card holder (permanent resident) vary by category and depend on whether you currently live inside or outside the United States. Click here to learn more.

Green Card through the Diversity Immigrant Visa Program

The Diversity Immigrant Visa Program (DV Program) makes up to 50,000 immigrant visas available annually, drawn from random selection among all entries to individuals who are from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States. The DV Program is administered by the U.S. Department of State (DOS).

How Do I Become a Lawful Permanent Resident While Living in the US?

The Immigration and Nationality Act provides an individual two primary paths to permanent resident status. Adjustment of status is the process by which an eligible individual already in the United States can get permanent resident status (a green card) without having to return to their home country to complete visa processing.

I am a permanent resident. How do I help my relative become a U.S. permanent resident?

As a permanent resident of the United States, you may help a relative become a lawful permanent resident based on your status. To do so, you will need to sponsor your relative and be able to prove that you have enough income or assets to support your relative(s) when they come to the United States. Click here to learn more.

I am a U.S. citizen. How do I help my fiancé(e) become a U.S. permanent resident?

A U.S. citizen who wishes to marry a non-U.S. citizen or permanent resident can help their fiancé(e) obtain permanent residence in different ways. Click here to learn more.

I am a U.S. citizen. How do I help my relative become a U.S. Permanent Resident?

As a citizen of the United States, you may help a relative become a lawful permanent resident of the United States by obtaining what is often referred to as a “Green Card.” To do so, you need to sponsor your relative and be able to prove that you have enough income or assets to support your relative(s) when they come to the United States. Click here to learn more.

Marriage/Divorce and Immigration

Click here for information about how the status of your marriage can affect the status of your immigration to/residence in the U.S.

What Are My Rights as an Immigrant When Talking to the Police or ICE?

You have constitutional rights when talking to the police or ICE even when you are an immigrant. Learn what you can do, what you don't have to do, and what you must do when talking to the police or ICE.

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