Montana

Fair Debt Collection - Things Debt Collectors Can and Can't Do / Cobro Justo de Deudas – Qué Puede y No Puede hacer un Cobrador de Deudas

Authored By: Montana Legal Services Association (MLSA) LSC Funded
Contents
Information

Information

Federal law protects you from certain unfair and harassing actions by debt collectors. The law is called the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA). Under the law, a debt collector may not harass, abuse, mislead, lie, or be unfair to you. The law covers personal, family and household debts. It does not cover business or commercial debts.

 

Who is a debt collector? A debt collector is anyone who collects debts for others. In other words, if you owe money to a business, that business is not considered a debt collector. However, debt collection agencies are considered debt collectors. Only debt collectors are covered under the FDCPA. The law does not apply to creditors who collect their own debts.

 

How may a debt collector contact me? A debt collector may contact you in person, by mail, telephone, telegram, or fax. However, if you write a letter to the debt collector asking them to stop contacting you, they must stop. This letter is called a "cease contact letter." Once a debt collector gets your letter, they can't contact you again, except to say there will be no further contact or that they intend to take a certain legal action against you. If they do contact you, they are breaking the law, and you should talk to a lawyer. Click here for a form letter to tell a creditor to cease contact with you. As with any other letters you send, make a copy of the letter and save it in a safe place. Send the letter by certified mail, return receipt requested. Save the certified mail receipt and the green return receipt with your copy of the letter.

Keep in mind that this letter does not make the debt go away. It only forces the debt collector to stop contacting you. The debt collector can still take you to court to try to collect your debt.

 

What is a debt collector NOT allowed to do?

A debt collector may not contact you an excessive number of times or at unreasonable times or places, such as before 8:00 a.m. or after 9:00 p.m. A debt collector may not contact you at work if the debt collector knows that your employer doesn't allow such calls. If you are contacted at work, tell the debt collector in writing that your employer does not allow such calls. Click here for a form letter telling a debt collector to stop contacting you.

If the debt collector calls you at work after he knows that collection calls are not allowed, talk to a lawyer. Keep a piece of paper by your phone and write down the date and time of each phone call. If you talk to the debt collector, write down what the debt collector said to you. Be sure to write down each time the collector calls. Also keep a list of witnesses who heard the debt collector's calls. It is against the law to call you at work after you tell a debt collector not to. Your written record and witnesses may help you if you have to go to court later.

 

May a debt collector contact anybody else about my debt?

If you have a lawyer, the debt collector may not contact anyone other than your lawyer, including you. If you don't have a lawyer, a debt collector may contact other people, but only to find out where you live and work. The debt collector can not contact other people if he already has your contact information. A debt collector can not contact other people to get location information more than once. A debt collector can not tell or suggest to anyone other than you and your attorney that you owe money.

 

What harassing and abusive acts by debt collectors are against the law?

Debt collectors may not harass or abuse anyone. For example, debt collectors may not do the following:

  • threaten to harm anyone or damage anyone's property;
  • threaten to harm or damage anyone's reputation;
  • publish a list of debtors (except to a credit bureau);
  • use obscene or profane language;
  • repeatedly use the phone to annoy anyone;
  • call you without identifying themselves; or
  • advertise your debt for sale.

 

What misleading and deceptive acts by debt collectors are unlawful?

Debt collectors may not lie to you or mislead you. For example, debt collectors may not do the following:

  • say you have committed a crime (it is NOT a crime to have debt);
  • say you will be arrested or jailed if you don't pay your debt;
  • say they will take your income, money, or property unless it is legal to do so and they actually intend to do so;
  • say that a lawsuit will be filed against you, when they don't intend to. For example, its against the law for a debt collector to send you a letter saying that he will sue you in 10 days if you don't pay the debt, and then not sue you within 10 days;
  • say or suggest that papers being sent to you are court papers, when they are not;
  • say or suggest that papers being sent to you are not court papers, when they are;
  • send you papers made to look like they are from a court or from the government, when they are not;
  • falsely say or suggest they are attorneys or that an attorney is helping collect the debt;
  • falsely state the amount of your debt; or
  • use a false name.

 

What unfair acts by debt collectors are unlawful? Debt collectors may not be unfair. For example, debt collectors may not do the following:

  • call you collect, or send telegrams you must pay for;
  • contact you by postcard;
  • put anything on an envelope that shows it comes from a debt collector;
  • collect any amount greater than your debt, unless it is legal to do so; or
  • deposit a post-dated check before the date on the check.

 

What control do I have over payment of my debts? If you owe more than one debt, any payment you make must be applied to the debt you indicate. A debt collector may not apply a payment to any debt you don't believe you owe.

 

What if a debt collector breaks the law? You may sue the debt collector in state or federal court within one year from the date the debt collector broke the law. If you win, you may be able to get up to $1000 plus money for any damages you suffered. You also may get money to pay your court costs and any lawyer's fees. Because the law allows you to get lawyer's fees if you win, sometimes you can find a lawyer to take your case even if you don't have money to pay him up front. You should talk to a lawyer if a debt collector has broken the law.

 

What if I can't find a lawyer and don't want to sue the debt collector by myself? Lawsuits can be complicated and costly. Even if you don't plan to sue the debt collector, it is still very important that you keep detailed records of any contacts by the debt collector and any illegal actions they take. If the debt collector ends up taking you to court over the debt, you may be able to counter-sue with evidence of the debt collector's illegal actions. However, you may only counter-sue for a violation within one year of the date the violation occurred.

 

What records should I keep of my contacts with a debt collector? The most important thing you can do when dealing with a debt collector is to keep records and copies of all contact that takes place between you and the debt collector. Find a safe place to keep all of your records.

  1. Keep a piece of paper by your home, work, and mobile phones. Write down the date and time every time the debt collector calls you. If you talk to the debt collector, write down the name of the collection agency, the name of the person you talked to, and what he or she said to you. Be sure to write down EACH time the collector calls.
  2. Keep every letter and every envelope that a debt collector sends you. The information in the letter and on the envelope may be important if you have to go to court.
  3. Keep a copy of any letter you send to a debt collector and save it in a safe place. Send all letters by certified mail, return receipt requested. Save the certified mail receipt and the green return receipt with your copy of the letter.

 

What if the creditor contacts me instead of a debt collector? If the original creditor contacts you instead of a debt collector, then the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act does not apply. However, many of the rules and information that you have read still apply. A creditor who is collecting his own debts also may not harass, abuse, mislead, deceive, or be unfair to you. If you don't want to talk with a creditor on the phone, you can hang up the phone the same way you would with a debt collector.

 

Where can I report a debt collector for violating my rights? You can report any violation of your rights by a debt collector to the Montana Consumer Protection Office at 406-444-4500. You should also report such violations to the Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357), or click here to learn about their online complaint system.

 

Get this article as a PDF brochure.

-----------

 

Cobro Justo de Deudas – Qué Puede y No Puede hacer un Cobrador de Deudas

La ley federal lo protege a usted de ciertas acciones injustas y hostigadoras de los cobradores de deudas.La ley se llama Ley de Prácticas Justas para el Cobro de Deudas (Fair Debt Collection Practices Act) (FDCPA).Bajo esta ley, un cobrador no podrá acosar, abusar, manipular, mentir o ser injusto con usted.La ley cubre deudas personales, familiares y domésticas.No cubre deudas comerciales o de negocio.

¿Quién es un cobrador de deudas?

Un cobrador de deudas es cualquiera que cobre deudas para otros.En otras palabras, si usted debe dinero a un negocio, ese negocio no se considera un cobrador de deudas.Sin embargo, las agencias de cobro de deudas son consideradas cobradores de deudas.Sólo los cobradores de deudas están cubiertos bajo la FDCPA.La ley no aplica a los acreedores que cobran sus propias deudas.

¿Cómo puede contactarme un cobrador de deudas?

Un cobrador de deudas puede contactarlo en persona, por correo, teléfono, telegrama o fax.Sin embargo, si usted le escribe una carta solicitándole que se detenga, él se debe detener.La carta se llama “carta de cese de contacto”.Una vez que un cobrador de deudas recibe su carta, no puede contactarlo otra vez, salvo que sea para decir que no habrá más contactos o que pretenda iniciar acciones legales en su contra.Si de todos modos lo contacta, está violando la ley y usted debe hablar con un abogado.Una carta modelo de cese de contacto está disponible en MontanaLawHelp.org. Como con cualquier otra carta que envía, realice una copia de la misma y guárdela en un lugar seguro.Envíe la carta por correo certificado, con acuse de recibo solicitado.Guarde el recibo de correo certificado y el acuse de recibo verde con su copia de la carta.

Tenga en cuenta que esta carta no anulará la deuda.Solamente obligará al cobrador a que deje de contactarlo, pero éste aún puede llevarlo a tribunales para intentar cobrarle.

¿Qué NO está autorizado a hacer un cobrador de deudas?

Un cobrador de deudas no podrá contactarlo un número excesivo de veces o a horas o lugares no razonables, como antes de las 8:00 o luego de las 21:00.No puede contactarlo a su trabajo si sabe que su empleador no lo permite.Si igualmente lo contacta, dígale por escrito que su empleador no permite ese tipo de llamadas.Una carta modelo manifestándole a un cobrador de deudas de que cese de contactarlo en su trabajo está disponible en MontanaLawHelp.org.

Si el cobrador de deudas igualmente llama a su trabajo luego de saber que no está permitido, comuníquese con un abogado.Usted debe tener un trozo de papel cerca de su teléfono y anotar la fecha y hora de cada llamada.Si habla con el cobrador, escriba lo que éste le ha dicho.Asegúrese de escribir cada vez que lo llame.También, mantenga una lista de testigos que hayan escuchado sus llamadas.Es contra la ley que un cobrador de deudas lo llame a su trabajo luego de que usted le manifestó no hacerlo.Su registro escrito y testigos pueden ayudarlo en caso de que deba ir a un tribunal más tarde.

¿Puede un cobrador de deudas contactar a cualquier otra persona por mi deuda?

Si usted tiene un abogado, el cobrador de deudas no podrá contactar otra persona que a su abogado, incluyéndolo a usted.Si usted no posee un abogado, un cobrador de deudas puede contactar a otras personas, pero sólo para averiguar dónde usted vive y trabaja.El cobrador de deudas no puede contactar a otras personas si ya tiene su información de contacto.Tampocopuede contactar otras personas para obtener información sobre su ubicación más de una vez.Un cobrador de deudas no puede hablar o sugerir a nadie más que a usted y su abogado, que usted debe dinero.

¿Qué actos abusivos y hostigadores por parte de un cobrador de deudas están en contra de la ley?

Los cobradores de deudas no pueden hostigar o abusar de nadie.Por ejemplo, no pueden hacer lo siguiente:

·         amenazar con dañar a alguien o a la propiedad de alguien;

·         amenazar con dañar o perjudicar la reputación de alguien;

·         publicar una lista de deudores (excepto a una oficina de crédito);

·         utilizar lenguaje obsceno o profano;

·         utilizar repetidamente el teléfono para molestar a alguien;

·         llamarlo a usted sin identificarse; o  

·         publicar su deuda para la venta.

·         ¿Qué actos engañosos y manipulatorios de un cobrador de deudas son ilegales?

Los cobradores de deudas no pueden engañarlo o manipularlo.Por ejemplo, no pueden hacer lo siguiente:

·         decir que usted ha cometido un crimen (NO es un crimen poseer deudas);

·         decir que usted será arrestado o encarcelado si no paga su deuda;

·         decir que tomarán su ingreso, dinero o propiedades a menos que sea legal hacerlo y ellos estén dispuestos;

·         decir que presentará una demanda en su contra, cuando no pretende hacerlo.Por ejemplo, es contra la ley que un cobrador de deudas le envíe una carta diciendo que lo demandará en 10 días si usted no paga y luego no lo hace (no realiza la demanda dentro de 10 días);

·         decir o sugerir que los papeles enviados a usted son del tribunal, cuando no lo son;

·         decir o sugerir que los papeles enviados a usted no son del tribunal, cuando sí lo son;

·         enviarle documentos hechos para aparentar que son un formulario del tribunal o del gobierno, cuando no lo son;

·         decir falsamente o sugerir que hay abogados ayudando a cobrar la deuda;

·         estipular falsamente el monto de su deuda; o  

·         utilizar un nombre falso.

¿Qué actos injustos realizados por un cobrador de deudas son ilegales?

Los cobradores de deudas no pueden ser injustos.Por ejemplo, no pueden hacer lo siguiente:

·         llamar por cobrar o enviarle telegramas por los que usted deba pagar;

·         contactarlo por tarjeta postal;

·         colocar cualquier cosa en un sobre que muestre que proviene de un cobrador de deudas;

·         cobrar cualquier monto superior a su deuda, a menos que sea legal hacerlo; o

·         depositar un cheque de pago diferido antes de la fecha en el cheque.

¿Qué control debo poseer sobre el pago de mis deudas?

Si usted posee más de una deuda, cualquier pago que realice debe aplicarse a la deuda que indique.Un cobrador de deudas no puede no aplicar un pago a cualquier deuda que usted no cree que debe.

¿Qué sucede si un cobrador de deudas viola la ley?

Usted puede demandar al cobrador de deudas en un tribunal estatal o federal en el período de un año desde la fecha que este violó la ley.Si usted gana, usted tal vez obtenga $1000 de dinero extra por cualquier daño que haya sufrido.Usted puede obtener más dinero para pagar los costos del tribunal y cualquier comisión de abogado.Como la ley le autoriza  obtener la comisión del abogado si gana, a veces usted puede encontrar un abogado que tome su caso aun cuando no posea dinero para pagarle por adelantado.Usted debe contactar un abogado si un cobrador de deudas ha violado la ley.

¿Qué sucede si no puedo encontrar un abogado y no quiero demandar al cobrador de deudas por mí mismo?

Los juicios pueden ser complicados y costosos.Aun si usted no planea demandarlo, es muy importante que mantenga registros detallados de cualquier contacto del cobrador de deudas que haya recibido y acción ilegal que éste haya realizado.Si el cobrador de deudas finaliza llevándolo a usted a tribunales, usted podrá contra demandarlo con evidencia de las acciones ilegales que él realizó.Sin embargo, usted podrá contra demandar por una violación solamente hasta dentro de un año luego de la fecha en que la violación ocurrió.

¿Qué registros debo mantener de mis contactos con un cobrador de deudas?

Lo más importante que usted puede hacer mientras esté en contacto con un cobrador de deudas, es mantener registros y copias de todos los contactos que se den entre ambos.Encuentre un lugar seguro para guardar todo lo que posea al respecto.

Mantenga un trozo de papel cerca del teléfono de su casa, trabajo y celular.Escriba la fecha y hora de cada llamada recibida proveniente del cobrador de deudas.Si usted habla con él, escriba el nombre de la agencia de cobro, de la persona con la que habló y qué fue lo que le dijo.Asegúrese de escribir CADA VEZ que el cobrador llame.

Usted debe mantener cada carta y sobre que un cobrador le envíe en un lugar seguro.La información en la carta y el sobre puede ser importante si debe ir a un tribunal más tarde.

Realice una copia de cualquier carta que envíe a un cobrador y guárdela en un lugar seguro.Envíe todas las cartas por correo certificado, con acuse de recibo solicitado.Guarde el recibo de correo certificado y el acuse de recibo verde con su copia de la carta.

¿Qué sucede si me contacta el acreedor en vez de un cobrador de deudas?

Si lo contacta el acreedor original en vez del cobrador de deudas, entonces laLey de Prácticas Justas para el Cobro de Deudas no aplica.Sin embargo, varias de las normas e información que usted leyó aún son aplicables.Un acreedor que está cobrando sus propias deudas tampoco puede acosar, abusar, manipular o engañar o se injusto con usted.Si usted no desea hablar con un acreedor por teléfono, usted puede cortar, del mismo modo que haría en el caso de un cobrador de deudas.

¿Dónde puedo reportar la violación de mis derechos por parte de un cobrador de deudas?

Usted puede reportar cualquier violación a sus derechos por un cobrador de deudas a la Oficina de Protección al Consumidor de Montana al 406-444-4500. También debería reportar dichas violaciones a la Comisión Federal de Comercio (FTC) por el 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357).